Will Ban the Non-Competes Movement Lose Its Momentum During the Trump Administration?

donald_trump_rnc_h_2016It’s no secret that the Obama administration made a push, especially towards the end, towards limiting the use of non-compete agreements by employers around the country. The White House commissioned not one but two reports on this topic, both of which concluded that non-compete agreements stifle innovation, reduce job mobility, and negatively impact economic growth.  

Several states around the country seemed to join the White House’s view on non-compete agreements in passing statutes limiting their use. Illinois, for example, recently enacted the Illinois Freedom to Work Act, 5 ILCS § 140/1 et. seq., which prohibits private employers from entering into non-competition agreements with “low-wage employees.” Utah passed the Post-Employment Restrictions Act, Utah Code § 34-51-101 et seq., in March 2016, restricting non-competes’ length to 1 year.  Massachusetts tried to pass a similar legislation this year, but failed. And New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman announced that he will propose legislation in 2017 to limit the use of non-compete agreements in New York.  

Will this push to limit non-compete agreements continue during the Trump administration?  My prediction is that it won’t.  Of course, as with many other areas of the law, predicting what Trump will or will not do, is like reading tea leaves – nobody really knows. However, here are my top three reasons for thinking that the Trump Administration won’t pursue the same stance on non-compete agreements as the Obama Administration. 

First, Trump is a savvy businessmen and an employer. Therefore, he knows the value of non-compete agreements to employers and, without a doubt, has used them himself in his many businesses. 

Second, Trump has demonstrated that he is not above using such agreements in what some would view as overreaching situations.  For example, he did not shun from using non-compete agreements with the volunteers for his political campaign, even though the volunteers were not paid compensation for their services and probably performed tasks that did not involve any confidential information.

Third, Trump’s recent appointment of Andrew F. Puzder – the former CEO of a fast-food franchise – as the Secretary of Labor, suggests that his focus may not be on helping low-wage employees. Mr. Puzder had openly criticized the minimum wage increase that was supposed to go into effect this December and is commonly perceived as an ally for employers.  His position on ACA, minimum wage, and the joint-employer rule promulgated by the NRLB, is contrary to the position taken by the Obama administration. Thus, if he takes a 180-degree shift from the Obama administration’s stance on non-competes, such position won’t come as a surprise. 

Employers should stay tuned to see how the Trump’s policy on non-competes develops in 2017…

Leiza litigates unfair competition, non-compete and trade secrets lawsuits on behalf of companies and employees, and has advised hundreds of clients regarding non-compete and trade secret issues. If you need assistance with a non-compete or a trade secret misappropriation situation, contact Leiza for a confidential consultation at LDolghih@GodwinLaw.com or (214) 939-4458.

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