Is Donald Trump Crossing the Line with Non-Competes for Volunteers?

ddDonald Trump has been criticized for everything under the sun – from having small hands to being racist. However, the most recent critique surrounds Trump’s campaign volunteer agreements that contain strict non-compete, non-solicitation and non-disparagement clauses. Several media outlets have questioned whether such agreements would be enforceable in court.  

According to the Daily Dot, which claims to have obtained a copy of these six-page volunteer agreements, such documents  contain the following restraints:

No Disparagement.  During the term of your service and all times thereafter you hereby promise and agree not to demean or disparage publicly the Company, Mr. Trump, and Trump Company, any Family member, or any Family Member Company or any asset any of the foregoing own, or product or services any of the foregoing offer, in each case by or in any of the Restricted Means and Contexts and to prevent your employees from doing so.

No Competitive Services. Until the Non-Compete Cutoff Date you promise and agree not to assist or counsel, directly or indirectly, for compensation or as a volunteer, any person that is a candidate or exploring candidacy for President of the United States other than Mr. Trump and to prevent your employees from doing so.

No Competitive Solicitation.  Until the Non-Solicitation Cutoff Date you promise and agree not to hire or solicit or hiring, or assist any other person, entity or organization to have or solicit for hiring, any person that is an independent contractor of, employee of an independent contractor of, or employee of Company or any other Trump Person and who at any time provides services for the project or objective for which you or your employer, as applicable, are being hired.

So, could these restraints be enforceable? Without knowing which state’s law applies to the agreement, it’s impossible to say for sure.  However, under Texas law, these restraints could be enforceable.  You are probably wondering how is that even possible. Here’s how. 

First, under the Texas Covenants not to Compete Act, a non-compete clause must be ancillary to an “otherwise enforceable agreement.”  If Trump’s volunteer agreements contain a confidentiality clause and he shares confidential information with the campaign volunteers, then any non-compete and non-solicitation restraints are ancillary to the confidentiality agreement.  Thus – no different from a typical employer-employee agreement – if Trump’s volunteers get confidential information related to his campaign, he can demand that they may not compete with him.

Second, under Texas Covenants not to Compete Act, the non-compete restraints must have “reasonable” geographic area, time, and scope of activity limits. Since the presidential campaign spans the entire country, a nationwide non-compete area is arguably reasonable.  The time limit could be reasonable depending on what is the “Non-Compete Cutoff Date.” In this case, it would have to be tied to the current elections cycle.  Finally, the scope of activity restraint could be reasonable depending on what tasks a particular volunteer performed for Trump’s campaign.  If his tasks included bringing coffee and making copies, then a non-compete would that prohibits him from working in any capacity for another candidate would not  be enforceable.  However, if a particular volunteer organized rallies, participated in the campaign strategy or polling, or was engaged at a high-level within Trump’s campaign, then the non-compete’s scope could be upheld as “reasonable.”

Takeway: Many employees firmly believe that non-compete agreements are not enforceable. It doesn’t help that many internet sources use words like “right to work” or “right to compete” that mislead employees into believing that they have certain rights that their employment contracts cannot trump. That is not true.  Employers also often err in thinking that the broader their non-compete agreements are, the better off they’ll be when the time comes to enforce them.  This is also not true as this approach may backfire in those states like Texas where non-compete statutes have built-in mechanisms that punish employers for having overboard non-competes.  Thus, both employees and companies should have their non-compete agreements reviewed and/or drafted by lawyers familiar with non-compete law in their particular state before such agreements become a subject of a heated dispute.

Leiza litigates non-compete and trade secrets lawsuits on behalf of COMPANIES and EMPLOYEES in a variety of industries, and knows how such disputes typically play out for both parties. If you need assistance with a non-compete or a trade secret misappropriation situation, contact Leiza for a confidential consultation at Leiza.Dolghih@lewisbrisbois.com or (214) 722-7108.

2 Comments on “Is Donald Trump Crossing the Line with Non-Competes for Volunteers?

  1. Pingback: White House Calls on States to Ban or Limit Non-Compete Agreements | North Texas Legal News

  2. Pingback: Will Ban the Non-Competes Movement Lose Its Momentum During the Trump Administration? | North Texas Legal News

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s