Category: Texas Employment Law

Renewing Non-Disclosure Agreements with Employees? Consider this . . .

In my practice, I see this scenario all the time: an employee leaves to work for a competitor, the employer realizes that its non-disclosure (NDA) or non-compete agreement was inadequate to protect it from what just happened, so the company rolls out a new…

Texas Amends Its Trade Secrets Statute Effective September

Texas’ recent amendments to its trade secrets statute made it the most comprehensive and modern statute in the nation. It is the only statute in the nation that addresses when a competitor can be excluded from the courtroom to prevent disclosure of trade secrets during the lawsuit.

The Biggest Myth About Non-Compete Agreements

In Texas, non-compete agreements are enforceable if they meet certain requirements and contain reasonable restrictions on the term, geographic scope and the scope of the restrained activities.

Texas Supreme Court Nixes Employee’s Defamation Claim, Reinforces At-Will Employment Doctrine

Last week, the Texas Supreme Court declined to recognize a theory of compelled self-defamation, and, in rejecting it, joined an emerging majority of state courts that have considered the issue, including those in Connecticut, Massachusetts, Hawaii, Tennessee, Iowa, Pennsylvania, and New York.

Enforcing Non-Compete Agreements in Texas – The Issue of Consideration

In this state, the consideration must have a “reasonable relationship” to the employer’s interest in restraining the employee from competing. Simply restricting an employee from lawful competition for the sake of preventing competition will almost certainly fail.

How to Fire Employees Without Being Sued

In the spirit of an old proverb that advises that “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure,” this article provides a list of best practices that can help avoid wrongful-termination types of lawsuits and the business interruption that comes with such litigation.

A Two Day Suspension is Not a Materially Adverse Action – Rules the Fifth Circuit

An employee must show that unpaid leave caused him or her physical, emotional, or economic harm via some documentation and not just conclusory statements in order to establish a “materially adverse action” by the employer.

5th Cir. Update: Employee Lies, Resists During Investigation; Employer Still on the Hook for Retaliation

According to the Fifth Circuit, a supervisor cannot start a groundless internal investigation as a retaliation for employee’s previous discrimination complaint and then, when employee resists investigation, fire him.

5th Cir. Rules No Pain & Suffering, Punitive Damages For ADEA Retaliation Claims

The Fifth Circuit does not allow pain and suffering and punitive damages in discrimination and retaliation claims under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act.

Why the Appointment of Jeff Sessions as the New Attorney General May Lead to More Trade Secrets Litigation

On Friday, President-elect Donald Trump named Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions as his pick for the next Attorney General. Sessions is a former U.S. attorney and current senator with lengthy experience with the Justice Department. He is also known as a pro-business conservative, who on…