Defamation in Texas: Being Called a “Liar” Will Not Get You Presumed Damages

Texas law recognizes two types of defamation: defamation and defamation per se. While a plaintiff has to prove actual damages in a defamation claim, such damages are presumed in a defamation per se lawsuit, making it a much easier claim for the plaintiff to prove. Whether a particular statement constitutes a defamation or a defamation per se depends on the nature of the statement. Texas law presumes that the following statements are defamatory per se: (1) statements that unambiguously charge a crime, dishonesty, fraud, rascality, or general depravity or (2) statements that are falsehoods that injure one in his office, business, profession, or occupation. See Main v. Royall, 348 S.W.3d 318, 390 (Tex. App.—Dallas 2011, no pet.).

Recently, in the case of Hancock v. Variyam, the Texas Supreme Court found that the statements that a doctor “lacked veracity” and “dealt in half truths” and circulated to his colleagues were not defamatory per se because they did not injure him in his profession as a physician. The Supreme Court proceeded to reverse $181,000 award of damages ($90,000 in actual damages and $85,000 in exemplary damages) because the doctor had failed to provide any proof of them at trial.

The Supreme Court explained that “because the [defamatory] statements did not ascribe the lack of a necessary skill that is peculiar or unique to the profession of being a physician” they were not defamatory per se. Furthermore, because “the specific trait of truthfulness is not peculiar or unique to being a physician,” but is a trait that is necessary in every profession, the defendant’s statement that the plaintiff “lacked veracity” was not defamatory per se. Thus, the plaintiff had to provide evidence of actual damages he had suffered due to the plaintiff’s statements – either evidence that he had lost patients or suffered mental anguish – in order to recover under this claim.

The Supreme Court rejected the Court of Appeals’ reasoning that accusing somebody of being a liar is so obviously hurtful to the person that the damages should be presumed. It also rejected the plaintiff’s argument that the statements by the defendant that the plaintiff “lacked veracity” would so clearly impact his patient care, teaching, research, and publication, that the damages had to be presumed.

Providing an example of what statements would be considered defamatory per se, the Supreme Court relied on the Restatement (Second) of Torts § 573, explaining that statements that a physician is a drunkard or a quack or that he is incompetent or negligent in the practice of his profession or that he is dishonest in his fees, would constitute defamation per se, and the damages would be presumed.

THE PRACTICAL EFFECT: Defamation is a great tool for protecting one’s professional reputation or reputation as a business owner. However, before diving into a defamation lawsuit, it is important to assess what evidence a party will need to prove a claim of defamation and what evidence it has. If the purported defamatory statements fall under the defamation per se category, then the damages will be presumed. However, if the statements are of general nature and do not specifically relate to the party’s profession or occupation, the injured party will have to put on evidence of actual damages incurred as the result of such statements.

According to Hancock, unless being truthful is a specific trait of a profession or a business, being called or labeled a “liar” is not enough to allow a presumption of actual damages.

For more information regarding defamation claims in Texas, contact Leiza Dolghih.

One Comment on “Defamation in Texas: Being Called a “Liar” Will Not Get You Presumed Damages

  1. A very clear exposition. it ´s very Helpful. I was falsely accused of making death threat against a professor at texas A&M. The consequences were devastating, and lead to a malicious prosecution after a false police report, dropped eventually by the J:P. This person kept defaming me during the entire disciplinary process the university held againts me. last week The university sent me a settlement letter recognizing she gave erroneous info. But they don´t want to fix anything. Imagine. I looking for a lawyer yo make a lawsuit. i have plenty of document , recordings, transcriptions. Can you give any reference of somebody in tn Texas? Thank you . Jose Maria Antolin. bryan . texas

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