Tag: trade secrets misappropriation

Is Credit Card Information Stored by a Restaurant a “Trade Secret”?

Credit card data (including cardholder names, credit or debit card numbers, and corresponding CVVs) were akin to passwords and usernames that provided access to something of value,” i.e. an individual’s line of credit with a financial institution or money in an account with a financial institution, and were not “trade secrets” under the Defend Trade Secrets Act.

A Study Concludes Mentioning “Trade Secrets” in Form 10-K Leads to More Cyber Breaches

Trade secrets only have value as long as they stay secret, so once they come into a competitor’s hands or become publicly available, their value is often destroyed.

An Injunction in a Theft-of-Trade-Secrets Case Cannot Prohibit a Party From Using Publicly Available Information

A court order prohibiting defendant from using trade secrets must be broad enough to cover all possible circumstances while narrow enough to include only the illegal activities.  Where that line lies depends on the circumstances of each particular case. 

Is a Client List a Trade Secret in Texas?

A “list of actual or potential customers or suppliers” of a company qualifies as a trade secret as long as: (1) its owner, i.e. the company, took reasonable measures to keep it secret and (2) the list has an economic value because it is not generally known and cannot be easily determined by another person. 

Employees’ Unauthorized Copying of Electronic Files is Not Theft in Texas

Before pleading a Texas Theft Liability Act claim against an employee for stealing the company’s data, information, documents, or other property, the company should make sure that there is at least some evidence of the employee’s intent to deprive the company of its property.

Proving Lost Profits in a Trade Secrets Case – An Expensive Lesson from a Texas Court of Appeals

Before filing a trade secrets case or in the early stages of such case, a company bringing a lawsuit should always consider the following questions: (1) what damages did we suffer? (2) how do we calculate such damages? (3) how do we prove the damages in court?

Why Trade Secrets Protection is Even More Important in the Strong Economy

It is a well-known fact that when the economy improves, employee mobility rises as well. The most valuable employees – those with a specialized skill set and many years of experience in a particular industry – tend to stay within that industry while moving among…

Texas Supreme Court Rules Competitors Can be Excluded from the Courtroom

Until recently, companies suing for trade secret theft ran a risk of having to disclose to their competitors in open court certain aspects of their trade secrets in order to prove their claim. The companies often argued that they shouldn’t have to give up…

No Non-Compete Agreement? No Problem! – What Texas Companies Can Learn from Oculus Rift Lawsuits

I advise all my business clients in Texas to have non-compete and non-solicitation agreements with their key employees. Why? Well, first of all, because Texas courts enforce such agreements, so it only makes sense to take advantage of them. Second, because clear, specific, and…

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