Protect Your Trade Secrets or Lose Them

TradeSecretsThe first rule of the fight club is you don’t talk about the fight club.  The same rule applies to trade secrets.  If you talk about your trade secrets – pricing, customer names, vendor relationships, or other aspects of your business, with people who do not have non-disclosure agreements, you are going to lose the “trade secret” status that such information may carry, which means your employees will be able to take that information to your competitor or their new business.

Under the Texas Uniform Trade Secrets Act (TUTSA), an owner of a trade secret must use “reasonable efforts under circumstances” to protects its trade secrets.  Depending on how large or sophisticated the business is, those methods may include anything from keeping key files in a locked cabinet to passwords for logging into a customer database, to issuing company computers that have no outside ports, to fingerprint and iris-scan access devices.  

Obviously, a mom-and-pop shop is not going to install fingerprint access devices or buy an expensive software that will alert it when an employee downloads an unusually large amount of information, but it can implement simple measures like asking all of its employees to execute a non-disclosure agreement as part of their employment file, make sure that the financial and other sensitive information is accessible only to the owners, and make sure that any confidential information, such as customer lists, is clearly marked as “confidential.” 

Larger businesses – those that wield a workforce comprised of dozens, hundreds, or thousands of employees – need to have more advanced trade secrets protection measures, as well as the periodic audits of the effectiveness of such measures.

At a bare minimum, all businesses should have a standard confidentiality (non-disclosure) agreement for its employees, vendors, investors, and anyone else who has access to the business’s trade secrets.  They should also look at what protection methods are used by their competitors or are common in their industry and implement those that make sense most for the company. 

A little time and expense invested in the trade secret protection on the front end can save thousands of dollars down the road.  If you think that providing company computers to your employees is too expensive, imagine how much it will cost in legal fees to retrieve your company’s confidential information from the departed employees’ personal devices.

Leiza litigates non-compete and trade secrets lawsuits in a variety of industries, and knows how such disputes typically play out for both parties. If you need assistance with a non-compete or a trade secret misappropriation situation, contact Leiza for a confidential consultation at Leiza.Dolghih@lewisbrisbois.com or (214) 722-7108. 

One Comment on “Protect Your Trade Secrets or Lose Them

  1. Pingback: Top 10 from Texas Bar Today: Memes, Trade Secrets, and Unanswered Questions | Texas Bar Today

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