5 Tips for Minimizing Trade Secrets Theft by Clients, Contractors and Vendors

Watching YouThe business world is littered with the carcasses of companies which, after they shared their confidential information and trade secrets with a non-competitor, such as their client, supplier, or vendor, were undercut by that party, who all of a sudden realized that they could profit from the information by cutting out the middle-man.

How can companies prevent this from happening? Here are the five basic tips on avoiding being blindsided by your own business partners:

  1. Never share your entire confidential information or trade secrets with anyone, no matter how sure you are that they won’t compete with you in the future.  This is a no-brainer, but limiting the access to the confidential information on a “need-to-know” basis is the easiest, yet the most underutilized, protection measure.
  2. Only disclose the information once the vendor/supplier/client signed a non-disclosure agreement. Simply put, do not share any sensitive information under you have a signed NDA in hand.  The NDA should state, among other things, that the vendor/supplier/client will make sure its employees are bound/will obey the NDA.
  3. Only share the information through a virtual data room, which allows you to track who accessed the information, when they did so, and what they did with it.  Some virtual data rooms allow you to set alerts for when a large amount of data is downloaded or printed. Such virtual data rooms also allow you to control the various permission settings to prohibit or limit the download or copying of the information and to limit access to certain individuals, rather than the entire companies or departments.
  4. Consider using software that allows you to track the information once it leaves the virtual data room. Some programs on the market allow you to track who has access to your information and what they do with it even after it leaves the virtual data room.  For extremely sensitive information, such measures may be worth the extra cost.
  5. Use data encryption when sharing confidential information outside the virtual data room. The encryption can now be done automatically and it prevents anyone who does not have an encryption key from reading the message – all they will see is a random collection of characters.

BOTTOM LINE:  In Texas, to claim trade secret protection, the owner of trade secrets must show that he/she took “reasonable measures” under the circumstances to keep the information secret. What constitutes “reasonable measures” is often a point of contention in lawsuits involving trade secrets misappropriation.  As the owner of trade secrets, you never want to be in a position where you cannot point to at least some measures you took to protect the confidential information.  Thus, the above steps are not only a great business practice, but they can also help in court if a company ends up suing its vendor/supplier/client for misappropriation of its trade secrets.

Leiza Dolghih is a partner at Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP in Dallas, Texas and a Co-Chair of the firm’s Trade Secrets and Non-Compete Disputes national practice Her practice includes commercial, intellectual property and employment litigation.  You can contact her directly at Leiza.Dolghih@LewisBrisbois.com or (214) 722-7108 or fill out the form below.

 

Texas Supreme Court Rules Competitors Can be Excluded from the Courtroom

cartoonUntil recently, companies suing for trade secret theft ran a risk of having to disclose to their competitors in open court certain aspects of their trade secrets in order to prove their claim. The companies often argued that they shouldn’t have to give up their trade secrets in order to pursue their legal rights.  On the other hand, defendants argued that they cannot defend against a claim when they don’t know what they are accused of taking. Last month, the Texas Supreme Court clarified how such dilemma is to be resolved. 

The Court ruled that a company suing for trade secret misappropriation may exclude its competitor’s representatives from the courtroom when their trade secrets are discussed, leaving only the lawyers and independent outside experts of the competitor to hear such testimony. This way, a defendant can learn the information it needs to defend against the claims brought against it, but the information cannot be used outside of the lawsuit. 

Under TUTSA, trial courts are required to take “reasonable measures” to protect trade secrets during litigation, including, among other things, “holding in camera hearings” i.e. hearings that are closed to the public because they will involve discussion of trade secrets.  TUTSA does not specifically define the term or explain exactly who may or may not be present during in camera hearings.  Recently, NOV and M-I Swaco battled in court over whether NOV’s corporate representative could be present at a hearing where M-I Swaco offered testimony about what trade secrets its former employee took from it and gave to NOV.

In In Re M-I, LLC d/b/a M-I Swaco, NOV argued that as a party to the lawsuit where it was accused of stealing trade secrets from M-I Swaco, it had a right to be present at a temporary injunction hearing and hear what trade secrets M-I Swaco claimed NOV misappropriated.  The Texas Supreme Court did not buy into this argument finding that in camera hearings could include hearings where a party or its representatives (but not its attorneys) could be excluded.

The Supreme Court explained that when a trial judge is faced with the decision on whether to exclude a corporate representative from the courtroom during testimony about trade secrets, which he might not already know by virtue of misappropriation, the judge must balance (1) the “degree of competitive harm” the party would have suffered from the disclosure of its trade secrets to the other party’s corporate representative and (2)  the degree to which a party’s defense of a trade secrets case might be impaired if its corporate representative is excluded from the courtroom.

To make this determination regarding the degree of competitive harm, the court must consider the relative value of the party’s trade secrets to its competitor as well as whether the corporate representative acts as a competitive decision-maker at his company.  If he does, disclosure of alleged trade secrets would “necessarily entail greater competitive harm” because, even when acting in good faith, the corporate representative would not be able to resist acting on what he or she may learn during the hearing. To determine whether a party’s defense might be impaired, the court should consider whether a corporate representative possess unique expertise that a party may not find in outside experts.

Takeway:  The Texas Supreme Court has made it clear that a company wishing to prosecute theft of trade secrets can do so without having to disclose its trade secrets to a competitor in an open court.  If the disclosure of such information in open court will harm the company, it may ask the judge to remove its competitor’s representatives from the courtroom when critical proprietary information is discussed, leaving it up to the other sides’ lawyers and experts to analyze the testimony or evidence.  While this will certainly increase the cost of trade secrets litigation, it will also ensure that a competitor cannot use the courtroom to get to the “secret sauce.”

Leiza litigates non-compete and trade secrets lawsuits in a variety of industries, and has advised hundreds of clients regarding non-compete and trade secret issues. If you need assistance with a non-compete or a trade secret misappropriation situation, contact Leiza for a confidential consultation at Leiza.Dolghih@LewisBrisbois.com or (214) 722-7108.

How to Protect Your Intellectual Property When Getting Involved in a Startup

kkOne of the factors that distinguishes successful startups from those that fail, is not just a great idea, but an idea that’s legally protected from theft. A source code that solves a major need in the market place is worthless unless the inventor can show that he is the legal owner of the code and can prevent others from copying it or using it without authorization.  There is a reason, after all, that Mr. Wonderful on Sharktank always wants to know if the invention that’s being pitched has been patented.

Think about it this way. When you buy a car, you want to know who owns it and you want to see the registration and the certificate of title before you give the seller money. If the person selling the car does not have the proper paperwork or there are multiple people claiming ownership of that car, you are probably going to walk away. Intellectual property is no different. Whether you are trying to sell it or get somebody to invest money in it, you are going to have to show that you own it.

I have previously explained the four different ways of protecting intellectual property here. Each type of intellectual property protection is designed to protect a different aspect of a product or invention, and a combination of these methods of protection can increase the value of a startup and the product it offers many times over.

Thus, for any startup owner, partner, contributor, or anybody who is involved in developing or improving a product offered by a startup, it is important to understand what rights each person or entity involved has with respect to that product.

Patent Ownership

As a default matter, unless there is an agreement to the contrary, each inventor is considered to be a co-owner of the patent. This means that each joint owner may make, use, sell, and import into the US the entire invention without seeking the permission of the other inventors and without accounting to the other inventors for any profits. If several inventors are listed on a patent application, it would be wise to have an agreement that assigns their ownership or licenses the patent to the startup, so that the startup entity and not individual patent-holders decide when or how to use, market or sell the invention in question.

Copyright Ownership

Just like patents, a copyrighted work which consists of parts that the authors intended to be merged, is co-owned by each author, absent an agreement to the contrary.  Thus, any co-owner of a copyright can use or license the entire work without the permission of other owners. However, unlike patents each co-owner must account to the other owners for any profits they receive.  This arrangement may be changed by the parties’ agreement and often is changed so that the copyright is assigned to the startup entity by individual authors so that the company controls who or when can use the copyrighted material.

If a startup employs independent contractors to create distinct parts of a product, their employment or independent contractor agreements should have an assignment of work clause so that there is a clear understanding that the finished product belongs to the company and not the independent contractor.

Trade Secrets

As I have explained before, in Texas, “trade secrets” are defined very broadly and may include any confidential information of a startup as long as it (1) has economic value because it is not generally known and (2) is subject to efforts to maintain its secrecy that are reasonable under circumstances. Thus, even those ideas and business processes that do not qualify for patents, copyright or trademark protection, can be protected by the owner as trade secrets. In Texas, this includes a “negative know-how,” which is information about what business processes or product development ideas have failed in the past.

Whereas an application for a patent or copyright forces startup owners to define their invention or idea for purposes of obtaining legal protection, trade secrets protection does not require an owner to put down on paper what he or she claims as a trade secret. Thus, an idea of a trade secret is a lot more amorphous and very few startup owners try to identify what type of trade secrets they have until it is too late – such as when they are embroiled in a litigation with a competitor or a former employee or partner.  Non-disclosure and non-compete agreements are a great tool for protection of trade secrets, but must be drafted carefully so as to make them enforceable in Texas.  Identifying what is a “trade secret” early on in a startup life is key to being able to protect such trade secrets down the road.

CONCLUSION:  While intellectual property law is a complicated area that many lawyers, much less startup owners, know little about, implementing certain basic measure at the beginning of a startup, can drastically decrease the chances of a lawsuit over the ownership down the road and significantly increase the chances of obtaining investment capital. Spending just a few hours on identifying all the existing and possible sources of intellectual property within a startup and then deciding on how to protect them will pay 10-fold down the road.

Leiza litigates non-compete and trade secrets cases in federal and states courts around Texas, and frequently advises business owners and startups on how to protect their trade secrets against misappropriation by competitors and employees and can be contacted at Leiza.Dolghih@lewisbrisbois.com or (214) 722-7108.

10 Tips on Preventing Trade Secrets Theft by Employees Who Work from Home

workfrom homeIn 2013, Marissa Mayer’s memo to Yahoo employees cancelling Yahoo’s work-from-home policy sparked a debate on whether working from home hurts or benefits companies, and whether any cost-savings associated with such an arrangement are outweighed by a decrease in productivity of remote employees. Very few critics, however, discussed the added risks of trade secrets theft by remote employees.  It seems that many companies put a lot of emphasis on in-the-office security measures, but apply a much laxer set of rules to those who work from home. Because of that approach, the work-from-home arrangements often become the Achilles heel of the companies’ security measures.

Here are 10 tips on how to eliminate, or at least reduce, the risk of trade secrets theft by remote employees:

1. Do Not Allow Employees with Access to Highly Sensitive Information to Work from Home. While almost every employee would prefer to work from the comfort of their home, when a high-level employee has access to a highly sensitive information, working from home should not be an option.  The risk of somebody duplicating or downloading the company’s proprietary information at their “home office” is much higher than in the regular workplace. So, have your key employees come in the office if they are going to handle your top-level proprietary information.

2. Have Remote Employees Sign Confidentiality and Non-Disclosure Policies.  If a company allows its employees with access to less sensitive but still confidential information to work from home, it should require employees to execute a non-disclosure and confidentiality policy that describes what types of information the company considers confidential and what repercussions the employees will face if they violate the policy.

3. Have Log-In Reminders Emphasizing Confidentiality.  If employees are required to log into a proprietary software or a program that contains the company’s proprietary data, have the software vendor create a pop-window that reminds the employees when they log in that they are accessing confidential information.  This acts as a constant reminder to the employees that the data they are accessing does not belong to them.

4. Allow Remote Employees to Work Only on Company-Issued Computers.  There is no question that allowing employees to do work from home on their own laptops, saves companies on the costs of purchasing, maintaining, and upgrading the equipment. However, those savings can be easily dwarfed by legal costs should an employer want to examine an employee’s personal computer for evidence of trade secrets theft. When an employee uses a company-owned laptop, the company can easily retrieve it from the employee upon request.  However, when an employee uses his or her personal device, the company’s road to retrieval of its data from that device becomes much thornier (and much more expensive).

5. Have A Remote-Wipe or Lock-Out Measures. This is a no-brainer and is a must for every company that allows employees to work remotely. A company’s IT department should be able to quickly terminate any remote employee’s access to proprietary information. It should also be able to wipe the company’s confidential information from the employees’ devices, when appropriate.

6. Control Access to Confidential Information. Not every remote employee needs to access every software program or every database that a company has.  Determine which employees need access to what types of programs or data, and keep track of that information as part of their personnel file.  When such employees are terminated, the company should have a clear idea of what they had access to and what they could have potentially taken with them. This is especially important for employees who have non-compete or non-solicitation agreements.

7. Monitor What Accounts, Programs, or Devices Are Used by Remote Employees. Whether a company is using a cloud-based sharing system, VPN, or is allowing its employees to log into particular databases online, somebody at the company should monitor the use and flag any suspicious activity. The level and frequency of monitoring will depend on the size of the business, the type of the confidential data, and the manner in which such data is kept.

8. Set Up Red Flag Alerts, if Possible.  A company should work with its IT department and software vendors to determine if they can set up alerts that would notify the company when somebody downloads or copies an unusually large amount of data, prints an unusually large number of documents, or deletes a large amount of information from the company’s system.

9.  Have A System in Place for When You Need to Recover Company-Issued Computers. Figure out ahead of time whether, upon a remote employee’s termination, the company will be sending somebody to their house to collect company equipment or will be requiring them to return the equipment themselves. Whatever the system is, getting company equipment quickly after an employee’s termination, should be a priority.

10.  Plan Ahead Before Terminating a Remote Employee. There is a reason why a fired employee is usually walked out of the office right away. Being upset about getting fired may cause some employees to destroy company property or take it with them as a way of payback to the employer.  This is even a bigger concern for remote employees, as there is a time gap between them receiving a termination notice and a company being able to get its equipment back. Therefore, it is crucial for a company to be able to terminate remote employees’ access to sensitive information swiftly, instruct them clearly on how to return the company’s equipment, and follow-up with enforcement if an employee fails to follow the instructions.

Some of the above measures are cheap and easy to implement (e.g., written policies).  Others, require assistance of an IT person or a department or a purchase of a costly monitoring software.  It is up to each company to determine whether the confidential information that their remote employees work with justifies the cost of implementing the above measures.  However, every company that has employees that work from home, should at least analyze its weak spots with respect to its proprietary information, and determine how it can reduce the potential of data and trade secrets theft by remote workers.

If you suspect that your business’s trade secrets have been misappropriated or you are looking to implement measures within your organization that will prevent or minimize the chances of trade secrets being misappropriated, contact Ms. Dolghih for a confidential consultation at Leiza.Dolghih@lewisbrisbois.com or (214) 722-7108.

Four Ways to Protect Your Business Ideas: Patents, Trademarks, Copyright, and Trade Secrets

pictureWhether you are an owner of an established business or a budding entrepreneur working on a start-up, understanding how you can protect your business ideas is key to making your company attractive to investors, securing funding, growing the company and ensuring the longevity of your business.

Depending on the type of idea that you have, the state of the idea, and the amount of money at your disposal, you have the following four ways to protect your intellectual property:

1. PATENTS.   There are three types of patents in the U.S.: utility patents (90% of all patents); design patents, and plant patents. Having a patent for an invention or a design allows the owner to exclude others from making, using, or selling the invention or design for a certain period of time.  To obtain a patent, a person must file an application with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).

Utility patent may be granted to anyone who invents or discovers any new and useful process, machine, article of manufacture, or composition of matter, or any new and useful improvement thereof.  Approximately 90% of the patent documents issued by the USPTO in recent years have been utility patents, also referred to as “patents for invention.”  Utility patents last up to 20 years from the date of patent application.

Design patent may be granted to anyone who invents a new, original, and ornamental design for an article of manufacture.  In general, a design patent is obtained for the aesthetically appealing features of a product. It gives the owner the right to prevent others from making, using, or selling a product that so resembles the patented product that an “ordinary observer” might purchase the infringing article, thinking it was the patented product.  An example of a famous design patent is Coca-Cola’s unique bottle shape. Also, many clothing companies often patent a unique design to prevent other companies from imitating it.  Design patents last for up to 14 years from the date of the grant.

In many circumstances, one may obtain a design patent in addition to a utility patent for the same invention. Also, to the extent that the subject qualifies as a work of art, there may be an opportunity to obtain a copyright for the same, and if the design is embodied in a physical article, and also functions as a trademark, a trademark registration may be obtained.

Plant patent may be granted to anyone who invents or discovers and asexually reproduces any distinct and new variety of plant.

The patent application process is complicated and can cost thousands of dollars as most applications require help from a qualified patent attorney or agent.  To maintain the force of the patent, you must pay fees due at 3.5, 7.5 and 11.5 years after the patent grant.  The total amount of maintenance fees for a small entity (such as an independent inventor) is $4,430, while bigger entities must pay $8,860.

2. COPYRIGHT. Copyright protects original works of authorship including literary, dramatic, musical, and artistic works, such as poetry, novels, movies, songs, computer software, and architecture. Copyright does not protect facts, ideas, systems, or methods of operation, although it may protect the way these things are expressed.  You do not have to register your work to have copyright protection.  However, only registered works may be eligible for statutory damages and attorney’s fees in a copyright infringement suit. Thus, you should register your work with the U.S. Copyright Office, which can be done online for just $35 – $55 fee.

The term of copyright for a particular work depends on several factors, including whether it has been published, and, if so, the date of first publication. As a general rule, for works created after January 1, 1978, copyright protection lasts for the life of the author plus an additional 70 years. For an anonymous work, a pseudonymous work, or a work made for hire, the copyright endures for a term of 95 years from the year of its first publication or a term of 120 years from the year of its creation, whichever expires first.

3. TRADEMARKS. A trademark is a word, phrase, or design that distinguishes the source of the goods of one business from its competitors.  A right in a trademark is acquired by use, but registration with U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) makes it easier to enforce such right.

To apply, you must have a clear representation of the mark, as well as an identification of the class of goods or services to which the mark will apply.  You can submit an online application, and filing fees vary according to the type and the number of classes of goods or services, among other factors. Filing an application for trademark is complicated, so, as with patents, most people hire attorneys who specialize in trademarks to handle the process.

4. TRADE SECRETS. Trade secrets in Texas are protected by the Texas Uniform Trade Secrets Act (TUTSA).  A Texas business or a person may claim as a trade secret any information that (1) has economic value because it is not generally known and (2) is subject to efforts to maintain its secrecy that are reasonable under circumstances. Trade secrets may include, but are not limited to the following: formula, pattern, compilation, program, device, method, technique, process, financial data or list of actual or potential customers or suppliers.

Thus, even those ideas and business processes that do not qualify for patents, copyright or trademark protection, can be protected by the owner as trade secrets, as long as they have economic value and the owner’s efforts to keep the ideas secret are reasonable under circumstances.

Under TUTSA, Texas business owners may also seek a temporary injunction to prevent misappropriation or threatened misappropriation of their trade secrets. A temporary injunction is a court order, which, if granted, prevents a person or a company from using the information claimed to be a trade secret.  Sometime, injunctive relief is the only way to protect valuable information from being stolen or misused by a competitor, but the owner must act fast after discovering misappropriation or a court might decide that the misappropriated information is not as valuable as the owner claims.

For more information about Texas trade secrets law, please click here.  If you suspect that your business’s trade secrets have been misappropriated or you are looking to implement measures within your organization that will prevent or minimize the chances of trade secrets being misappropriated, contact Ms. Dolghih for a confidential consultation at Leiza.Dolghih@GodwinLewis.com or (214) 939-4458.

 

A Few Lessons From the Morgan Stanley Trade Secrets Debacle

bitcoin-data-mining-online-currency-theftEarlier this month, a financial advisor at Morgan Stanley copied information of 350,000 of the company’s wealth management clients. A few days later, a sample data from 900 clients was posted on Pastebin, with the poster offering more in exchange for the payment in SpeedCoin, a type of virtual currency similar to BitCoin.

As it happens, earlier that year, Morgan Stanley hosted a bitcoin event at its headquarters, which all employees were invited to attend. And while Morgan Stanley CEO was busy announcing to the world that he does not understand what Bitcoin is, some lower level employees were apparently taking notes.

As you can imagine, the stolen data had a wealth, pun intended, of information about each client.  A six-year advisor was able to get the information by simply running reports within the company’s database. Although he was quickly fired after the breach was discovered, and is now subject to a FBI investigation, the damage to the company’s reputation in terms of clients’ trust has been done.  My guess is that the damage is quite significant, whether the company will admit it or not.

Unfortunately for business owners, trade secret theft is a daily occurrence. With the proliferation of personal electronic devices and the increasing connection of office devices, such as printers, faxes, etc. to the internet, confidential information can be stolen and shared with third parties in a matter of minutes.  The Morgan Stanley debacle shows that even the international powerhouses who have almost unlimited budgets and resources to protect their confidential information and the information of their clients can suffer from blind spots in their security systems that are meant to protect sensitive data. My guess is that Morgan Stanley relied a little too much on the criminal penalties bestowed upon those who misuse client data in the banking world and did not implement as strong of a security system as it should have.

As a business owner, manager, or a person in charge of the confidential information within your organization, it is your responsibility to make sure that that data is protected.  While it is impossible to keep up with every technological advantage, it is relatively easy to set up a protection system within the company that will prevent most, if not all, data theft. How, you say? Here’s how:

1.  Take a few hours and write down a list of every type of information that your company considers proprietary or confidential, even if it’s an obvious one.  This can include customer list and information, vendors list, source code for your software program, design plans for your product, your marketing plans, your financial data, etc.  Any successful business will probably have more than one type of confidential information.

2.  Consider who within your company or business has access to each type of confidential information.  Then, consider whether they need to have access to it.  For example, does your marketing department need to have access to your manufacturing schemes? Does your manufacturing department need to have access to your financials or customer list? It might seem silly, but I guarantee that after taking stock, you will find that some people or departments incidentally have access to the data that they don’t need or use in their jobs. Eliminate such access.  Of course, be careful not to deprive people of the information that they need to do their jobs.

3.  Consider whether each person with access to confidential information has signed proper agreements. Do your employees have non-compete agreements, non-solicitation agreements, and non-disclosure agreements? If they do, are the agreements consistent? Do they have all the necessary bells and whistles to make them enforceable? How long ago were they updated?  Having thorough yet clear agreements will discourage most employees from attempting to steal trade secrets.

4. Take stock of all electronic devices issued to employees.  Do you consistently keep track of what electronic devices are issued to employees by the company? Do you have a policy governing how such devices are used? Do you have security measures on such devices? Do you have a way to determine whether a device has been used to transfer confidential information? This is particularly important for the employees who work from home.

5. Do you have appropriate agreements with vendors, suppliers, business partners, and other parties who receive confidential information from you? If not, you need to add such agreements into your relationship with such parties to make sure that your confidential information is not used to replace or cut you out.

LESSON:  What happened at Morgan Stanley, can happen anywhere. But, it is less likely to happen in a company where employees get a sense that the company is serious about protecting its trade secrets and confidential information of its customers.  The serious attitude is conveyed to the employees by having an organized framework – from legal agreements, to passwords, to restricted access to non-essential employees – within the company. When employees see that a company’s efforts to protect its information are disorganized or haphazard, they are more likely to attempt theft of such information because they believe that they will not be caught. In Morgan Stanley’s example, it appears, that the company did not even know that the employee obtained its client data until weeks after it was posted for sale on the internet, which means that its internal database did not alert the company when large amounts of reports were being generated.

Make 2015 the year that you insulate your business from trade secret theft.

If you are facing a trade secret misappropriation claim or are suspecting that a theft of trade secrets occurred at your company, contact Leiza Dolghih at Leiza.Dolghih@GodwinLewis.com for a consultation.

What is a Trade Secret?

downloadWhat are trade secrets and how they are regulated depends largely on what state your business is operating in.  Currently, each state has it own statute and/or body of law that defines what is a “trade secret” and what legal remedies the owner of a trade secret may pursue if such trade secrets are taken or misappropriated from him or her.

In Texas, trade secrets are governed by the Texas Uniform Trade Secrets Act (TUTSA), which came into effect on September 1, 2013.

TUTSA defines “trade secrets” as “information,” that “derives independent economic value, actual or potential, from not being generally known to, and not being readily ascertainable by proper means by, other persons who can obtain economic value from its disclosure or use” AND “is the subject of efforts that are reasonable under the circumstances to maintain its secrecy.”  Thus, any information that has economic value – either actual or potential – and that the owner has reasonably attempted to keep secret, could constitute a “trade secret” under TUTSA.

Furthermore, TUTSA specifically provides that “trade secrets” may include the following types of information:

  1. formula
  2. pattern
  3. compilation
  4. program
  5. device
  6. method
  7. technique
  8. process
  9. financial data
  10. list of actual or potential customers or suppliers

Moreover, as defined by the statute, “trade secrets” may include information that its owner has not yet had an opportunity to use or information that the owner is no longer using (as long as it still has actual or potential economic value).

“Trade secrets” also include information that has commercial value from a negative viewpoint, such as the results of lengthy and expensive research which proves that a certain process will not work. See UTSA § 1 cmt.

Whether the information is considered “secret” is determined by whether a party undertook “reasonable efforts to maintain the secrecy of such information,” rather than the difficulty with which such information could be acquired.  The standard allows a fact finder to consider the nature of the trade secret and the facts and circumstances surrounding the efforts to maintain its secrecy in order to determine whether these efforts were reasonable under the circumstances.

To learn more about other provisions of TUTSA, see my previous post here.

If you are facing a trade secret misappropriation claim or are suspecting that a theft of trade secrets occurred at your company, contact Leiza Dolghih at Leiza.Dolghih@GodwinLewis.com.