Why the Appointment of Jeff Sessions as the New Attorney General May Lead to More Trade Secrets Litigation

jeff-sessions-827pngOn Friday, President-elect Donald Trump named Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions as his pick for the next Attorney General. Sessions is a former U.S. attorney and current senator with lengthy experience with the Justice Department. He is also known as a pro-business conservative, who on numerous occasions has expressed a favorable view of corporate indictments of executives marred in white-collar crimes. 

Sessions co-sponsored the Federal Defend Trade Secrets Act, which became the law this year. The statute allows civil lawsuits to prevent or redress theft of trade secrets in addition to already-existing criminal penalties under 18 U.S.C. § 1832.  His previous publicly expressed views suggest that he will not shy away from indicting big companies and individuals for white-collar crimes, which include theft of trade secrets.  

For example, in 2010, during a confirmation hearing for the U.S. deputy general, Sessions questioned the candidate about the “dangerous” philosophy of not charging companies criminally because of concerns regarding the effect of such charges on employees and shareholders and stated that he “was taught that if they violate a law, you charge them.” 

Trade secret theft indictments have been on the rise over the past several years, prompting an almost unanimous passage of the Federal Defend Trade Secrets Act in the beginning of this year. The uptick in criminal litigation has been accompanied by a blooming civil litigation of trade secrets theft on state and federal level as well.  

Given Sessions’ prior remarks regarding his preference for corporate indictments in lieu of settlements or payment of penalties, as well as his expressed support towards protection of trade secrets, we can expect a rise in corporate indictments arising out of theft of sensitive information (especially when it is shared with foreign companies or states). This will put the spotlight on the rise of trade secrets theft in the country, will garner more publicity for such acts, and will in turn educate the US companies and business owners as to legal remedies available to them in the civil court to remedy trade secret theft.  

In short, Sessions’ expected tough stance on corporate crime, including trade secrets theft and the accompanying publicity will likely result in an increase in civil litigation in that arena as well. 

Leiza litigates unfair competition, non-compete and trade secrets lawsuits on behalf of companies and employees, and has advised hundreds of clients regarding non-compete and trade secret issues. If you need assistance with a non-compete or a trade secret misappropriation situation, contact Leiza for a confidential consultation at Leiza.Dolghih@lewisbrisbois.com or (214) 722-7108.

Small Business Corner: Limiting Competition Through Contract Provisions

download (1)Whether you are hiring a new employee or entering in a contract with your vendor or supplier, if you are planning on giving these persons access to your business’ confidential information, such as customer lists, financial information, proprietary training materials, etc., you should make sure that the person you are sharing it with is not going to take that information and use it to compete against your business. There are several tools available to business owners to make sure that this does not happen.

When properly drafted, the following contractual provisions will serve to protect a business owner from unfair competition by a former employee or business partner:

  • Non-compete clause.  This clause prevents current employees or business partners from joining or forming a competing business after the end of their employment or business relationship with your company.  It is enforceable in Texas when certain conditions are met.
  • Non-solicitation of clients clause.  This clause prevents current employees or business partners from taking the company’s clients with them after their employment or business relationship with that company ends.
  • Non-solicitation of employees a.k.a anti-raiding clause.  This clause prevents current employees or business partners from poaching their former employer’s or business partner’s employees after the end of their employment or business relationship.
  • Non-disclosure clause.  This clause prohibits employees or business partners from using or disclosing confidential information that a company shared with them during their employment or business relationship.

To be enforceable, each clause has to be drafted specifically for your business.  There are some contract clauses that stay the same no matter what the substance of the contract or the business is – these are not those clauses.

A lot of business owners will adopt a friend’s or a former employer’s non-compete and non-solicitation agreements for their own use, or copy an agreement they found online.  However, those agreements usually work only until a company attempts to enforce them, leaving a business owner exposed to unfair competition at the precise moment when it needs the protection the most.

These copycat restrictive covenants often fail because a company that attempts to enforce them in court must show why a particular geographic area or a specified time period is reasonable for a particular employee, and explain exactly what is included in the definition of “confidential information” included in the non-disclosure clause.  This is virtually impossible to do if the agreement that the company is seeking to enforce was catered to a different company’s business, with different types of confidential information, and different employee structure.

Leiza litigates non-compete and trade secrets lawsuits on behalf of COMPANIES and EMPLOYEES in a variety of industries, and knows how such disputes typically play out for both parties. If you need assistance with a non-compete or a trade secret misappropriation situation, contact Leiza for a confidential consultation at Leiza.Dolghih@lewisbrisbois.com or (214) 722-7108.