A Texas Case Demonstrates Why Using Stock Non-Compete Agreements May Backfire

picLast month, a Texas Court of Appeals denied an insurance agency’s application for a temporary injunction against its former President because it held that the non-compete agreement, as written, did not restrict the President from competing. The agency tried to enforce the non-compete and non-solicitation agreement to prevent the President from soliciting the agency’s clients for the purpose of selling or marketing any products or services that would compete with the agency, and it was able to obtain a temporary restraining order (TRO).  However, the trial court refused to convert the TRO into a temporary injunction.

The reason the company lost at the temporary injunction hearing is because both the non-compete and non-solicitation clauses in the agreement stated that the President could not compete with or solicit the agency’s clients “during the term of CMC Account Development Sub Agent Agreement, and for a period of two (2) years after the termination of the Agreement.”  However, the agency’s representative and the President both testified that he was never a sub agent (i.e. sales person) for the agency and that he did not have a CMC Account Development Sub Agent Agreement.  

Basically, the non-compete and non-solicitation restraints were tied to the length of a non-existent agreement between the agency and the President. In most likelihood, the language was left over from the standard contract form that the agency used for its sales representatives, and was included in the President’s agreement due to oversight.  As the result, the company was unable to stop the President from competing. 

TexasBarToday_TopTen_Badge_VectorGraphicTakeaway:  This case demonstrates why the  companies should conduct an audit of their non-compete and non-solicitation agreements at least once a year to make sure that (1) the agreements are enforceable, (2) they have a legible copy of the agreements signed by both parties, and (3) the agreements will adequately protect the company if they have to be enforced. 

Leiza litigates non-compete and trade secrets lawsuits on behalf of COMPANIES and EMPLOYEES in a variety of industries, and knows how such disputes typically play out for both parties. If you need assistance with a non-compete dispute, contact Leiza for a confidential consultation at Leiza.Dolghih@lewisbrisbois.com or (214) 722-7108.

One Comment on “A Texas Case Demonstrates Why Using Stock Non-Compete Agreements May Backfire

  1. Pingback: Top 10 from Texas Bar Today: Overtime Rules, Tax Regulations, and Email Sweeps | Texas Bar Today

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